Why educators should use Ancestry Atlas

Ancestry Atlas is a learning activity aligned to curriculum outcomes similar to these:

  • Reflect on Intercultural experiences
  • Empathize with others
  • Develop Respect for Cultural Diversity
  • Investigate Culture and Cultural Identity

Ancestry Atlas It is part of a suite of Cultural Infusion products designed to develop Intercultural Understanding in students from K-12. In The Australian Government recently added Intercultural Understanding as a General Competency. The Learning Continuum identifies stages of development. UNESCO, in line with the UN Sustainable Development Goals, states that intercultural understanding is an essential part of a quality education if people are to live together peacefully, tolerating and accepting differences amongst cultural and ethnic groups.

The Ancestry Atlas makes learning more about your student population simple. Our website will make it easier for you to create a snapshot into the demographics of your students and their cultural heritage. Ancestry Atlas is a tactful way of reaching out to include the wider community around your school.

Studies have indicated that a whole school approach that involves the wider community is most effective for promoting long-lasting positive changes in Intercultural Understanding. If these attributes are supported at the school, in the community and at home rather than limiting them to time in the classroom then real change can be achieved.”

Ancestry Atlas is a conversation starter. Cultural Infusion educators have been using an offline paper-based version of Ancestry Atlas and find it a fantastic way to start a conversation about cultural diversity. Teachers requested that a digital version be created to simplify the process and make it easier to share the results with other people.

Ancestry Atlas helps schools address bullying and racism. Whilst we want to encourage a healthy pride in our own culture, this can descend into xenophobia and racism based bullying. In a study conducted by Steinbach (2010), a whole-school audit revealed they were creating spatial segregation, which was contributing to an ‘us versus them’ mentality amongst the students (Steinbach, 2010). The first step in facilitating positive change is getting to know one another and Ancestry Atlas facilitates this in a fun and engaging way.

We provide four example Lesson Plans. Your annual subscription comes with free lesson plans on how to use Ancestry Atlas in your classroom. These are step by step instructions that have been tested and refined. We also invite you to email us your ideas and lesson plans. We expect activities to map to cross curriculum objectives for Maths, Geography, Digital Literacies, History, and Social Science.

Ancestry Atlas Curriculum Alignment Notes & ideas

Map and Data Interpretation

1. INSTRUCTION PHASE: Interpreting the Ancestry Atlas data.

Objective: Using a key to the Ancestry Atlas the learner will interpret the data noting numerical information on location and population within a 10% range of the data collected

With so many curriculum points around data collection and interpretation of maps with Grades 3-5 it is pertinent to include some instruction on how the design of the Ancestry Atlas; how the data is collected and how to interpret or read the resulting AA image. We can provide a “making of” video that walks the student through how it was designed and instruction on how to interpret the legend or key to the map image.

If classes exchange their images then they can compare data sets and attempt to make predictions for how the graphs, map image etc. will look once the classes combine their data for a whole school exercise.

Concepts:

Location and population: the connection between the widening circles and the number of respondents for that location
Bar graphs: the numerical connection between the height of the bar graphs and the number of respondents

Curriculum Learning Outcome Notes
Fluency
Includes recalling multiplication facts, using familiar metric units to order and compare objects, identifying and describing outcomes of chance experiments, interpreting maps and communicating positions
Lesson on how to interpret the Ancestry Atlas map
Location and transformation
Create and interpret simple grid maps to show position and pathways (ACMMG065)
Can a grid be placed over the map and students can calculate how far their family had traveled, where relevant.
Interpret and compare data displays (ACMSP070) Students interpret the bar graphs, the width of the circles on the map point in relation to the number of respondents.
Interpret data and information displayed in different formats, to identify and describe distributions and simple patterns (ACHASSI057, ACHASSI078) Students interpret the bar graphs, the width of the circles on the map point in relation to the number of respondents.
Evaluating and reflecting
Draw simple conclusions based on analysis of information and data (ACHASSI058, ACHASSI079)
Students interpret the bar graphs, the width of the circles on the map point in relation to the number of respondents.
Curriculum Learning Outcome Notes
Concepts of print and screen
Identify features of online texts that enhance readability including text, navigation, links, graphics and layout (ACELA1793)
“The making of the Ancestry Atlas” and explanation of the connection between the data and the output describing how the data is most efficiently displayed using our methods
Location and transformation
Use simple scales, legends and directions to interpret information contained in basic maps (ACMMG090)
Students interpret the bar graphs, the width of the circles on the map point in relation to the number of respondents.
Evaluate the effectiveness of different displays in illustrating data features including variability (ACMSP097) Reflection/critique exercise with the Ancestry Atlas
Curriculum Learning Outcome Notes
Describe and interpret different data sets in context (ACMSP120) Given the Ancestry Atlas image students answer questions about the data displated.
Would an interactive questionnaire at the end be worth it? For example: how many other students were born in Melbourne? (the answer to the question could be auto-generated by the tool)

2. REFLECTION PHASE

In this phase, students can engage in self-reflection and discussion as well as pursuing opportunities to exchange Ancestry Atlas images with other schools with other Australian or International Schools.

Resources needed:

  • Repurposing of some of our anti-bullying curriculum and ICAP activities for learning about oneself, such as “what is in a name” and so forth.
  • Lesson on ethnicity versus nation versus nationality, there are a number of historical map resources and map images showing the difference between national borders and ethnic territories that can be used.
  • Information about what diversity does for a community

Potential partners to share and compare infographs:

  • Asia Education Foundation (Asialink)
  • Flat Connections
  • Inviting classes on the highly active “Connected Classrooms” Google+ social media group
  • Promoting to #globaledchat on twitter (Thursdays 5pm PST)
  • Inviting graduates of the Global Competence Certificate through World Savvy

Example discussion questions:
How diverse is our community?
How many of us (the students) were born in the same city or country?
How many of us (the students) were born in different cities or countries?
How many of our parents were born in the same or different cities or countries?
How many of our grandparents were born in the same or different cities or countries?
What things do we all do the same or differently? (food, celebrations, holidays, living situation such as whole family together, family spread apart etc. this will require some activity sheets or guides)
What about yourself or your family do you feel most proud to share?
Is there anything about your family or background you feel nervous or shy about sharing?
Do you worry about feeling “different” to your classmates?
What information wasn’t included in Ancestry Atlas that we would like to discover more about?
Are all of the country borders the same now as when your grandparents were born?
Are any of your parents or grandparents from places that have changed a great deal? (For example borders have shifted around the former USSR or East and West Germany. Also Czechoslovakia became Czech Republic and Slovakia or Singapore separated from Malaysia)

Activities:
Multimedia displays featuring photos, video and stories about your family history

Curriculum Learning Outcome Notes
ICU: identify and describe variability within and across cultural group Students assess how diverse their community is
ICU: identify and describe the roles that culture and language play in shaping group and national identities Students discuss contributions of various cultural groups to Australian identity, local or national. Lesson information about inclusion, or lack thereof, would be useful here.
ICU: discuss opportunities that cultural diversity offers within Australia and the Asia-Pacific region What does our diversity bring us? A discussion of this can be followed by the information we are putting into the corporate diversity presentation
ICU: identify and discuss the significance of a range of cultural events, artefacts or stories recognised in the school, community or nation This can be used for all 3 stages of the experience
ICU: identify and describe what they have learnt about themselves and others from real, virtual and vicarious intercultural experiences This can be used for all 3 stages of the experience
ICU: explain what and how they have learnt from a wide range of intercultural interactions and experiences This can be used for all 3 stages of the experience
Curriculum Learning Outcome Notes
Investigate community resources and ways to seek help about health, safety and wellbeing (ACPPS053) This can be drawn from our ICAP and older anti-bullying curriculum. Some students may feel exposed or embarrassed or different, it’s important we have some lessons that make them feel supported.
The different cultural, religious and/or social groups to which they and others in the community belong (ACHASSK093) Through discussion students will unpack what the data shows. It offers opportunities to invite their family members to present to the class, for them to give a presentation about their identity
Curriculum Learning Outcome Notes
How people with shared beliefs and values work together to achieve a civic goal (ACHASSK118) ?
Being healthy, safe and active sub-strand
Examine how identities are influenced by people and places (ACPPS051)
This can be drawn from our ICAP and older anti-bullying curriculum. Some students may feel exposed or embarrassed or different, it’s important we have some lessons that make them feel supported.
Communicating and interacting for health and wellbeing sub-strand
Practise skills to establish and manage relationships (ACPPS055)
This can be drawn from our ICAP and older anti-bullying curriculum. Some students may feel exposed or embarrassed or different, it’s important we have some lessons that make them feel supported.
Identify how valuing diversity positively influences the wellbeing of the community (ACPPS060) This can be drawn from our ICAP and older anti-bullying curriculum. Some students may feel exposed or embarrassed or different, it’s important we have some lessons that make them feel supported.

3. INVESTIGATION PHASE

Students record information about themselves, their families and their community and select ways to display and share it.

Projects:

  • How our city/suburb/town has changed: constructing a timeline beginning with what they can discover about the original Aboriginal inhabitants of the region through to now, including the arrival of members of their family.
  • Create a multimedia presentation (photos, video, stories etc.) of their family. Where relevant it can include a map showing their journey to new places if they have moved.
  • Important aspects they feel should have been included in Ancestry Atlas can be captured and then the design of a method for recording and displaying data can be developed and shared.
  • If working with an international partner school then the 21st Century Pen Pal activity can be done.

    Resources needed:
    · Multimedia instruction for example, how to create a page or blog and host media on Google Apps

  • Curriculum Learning Outcome Notes
    Communicating
    Represent and communicate observations, ideas and findings using formal and informal representations (ACSIS060)
    How the community has changed and remained the same over time and the role that people of diverse backgrounds have played in the development and character of the local community (ACHASSK063) Project based investigation into the community, they could contact their local historical society or discover who among the families within the school has ties to the local history.
    Sequence information about people’s lives and events (ACHASSI055, ACHASSI076) Through the creation of a timeline for the local community
    The representation of Australia as states and territories and as Countries/Places of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples; and major places in Australia, both natural and human (ACHASSK066) Students compare the state/city/suburb borders to the original native populations territories
    Why people participate within communities and how students can actively participate and contribute (ACHASSK072) This can be drawn from our ICAP and older anti-bullying curriculum. Some students may feel exposed or embarrassed or different, it’s important we have some lessons that make them feel supported.
    Pose questions to investigate people, events, places and issues (ACHASSI052, ACHASSI073) Community history project
    Locate and collect information and data from different sources, including observations (ACHASSI053, ACHASSI074) This is where students can interview and record the elderly of their area for example
    Record, sort and represent data and the location of places and their characteristics in different formats, including simple graphs, tables and maps, using discipline-appropriate conventions (ACHASSI054, ACHASSI075) A lesson on different ways to present data is needed
    Interpret data and information displayed in different formats, to identify and describe distributions and simple patterns (ACHASSI057, ACHASSI078) This is where the learning from Ancestry Atlas “how to” is applied
    Evaluating and reflecting
    Draw simple conclusions based on analysis of information and data (ACHASSI058, ACHASSI079)
    This is where the learning from Ancestry Atlas “how to” is applied
    Recognise different types of data and explore how the same data can be represented in different ways (ACTDIK008) This is where the learning from Ancestry Atlas “how to” is applied
    Curriculum Learning Outcome Notes
    Data representation and interpretation
    Select and trial methods for data collection, including survey questions and recording sheets (ACMSP095)
    Construct suitable data displays, with and without the use of digital technologies, from given or collected data. Include tables, column graphs and picture graphs where one picture can represent many data values (ACMSP096)
    Evaluate the effectiveness of different displays in illustrating data features including variability (ACMSP097)
    Investigate community resources and ways to seek help about health, safety and wellbeing (ACPPS053)
    The different cultural, religious and/or social groups to which they and others in the community belong (ACHASSK093)
    Concepts of print and screen
    Identify features of online texts that enhance readability including text, navigation, links, graphics and layout (ACELA1793)
    Curriculum Learning Outcome Notes
    Data representation and interpretation
    Pose questions and collect categorical or numerical data by observation or survey (ACMSP118)
    Construct displays, including column graphs, dot plots and tables, appropriate for data type, with and without the use of digital technologies (ACMSP119)
    Describe and interpret different data sets in context (ACMSP120)
    How people with shared beliefs and values work together to achieve a civic goal (ACHASSK118)
    Being healthy, safe and active sub-strand Examine how identities are influenced by people and places (ACPPS051)
    ICU: identify and discuss the significance of a range of cultural events, artefacts or stories recognised in the school, community or nation There is a perspective taking exercise in ICAP about people leaving their homes and only being able to take 2-3 belongings with them. There would be many stories we could draw on for this, especially considering the number of Holocaust survivors in Melbourne. Students could try to come up with objects that were important to their family that may have traveled some distance.

    This then offers the opportunity to cross-promote Joko’s World Instrument apps and world of instruments and offer stories about how instruments such as the Dilruba and Harmonium were adapted over distances.

    ICU: identify and describe what they have learnt about themselves and others from real, virtual and vicarious intercultural experiences
    ICU: explain what and how they have learnt from a wide range of intercultural interactions and experiences